Reports

Issue Briefs

Improving California’s Stream Flow Monitoring System

Our UC Water Issue Brief provides foundational background on the topic and early recommendations. Stream flow data support day-to-day decisions about how to manage water and operate water infrastructure—decisions that have important implications for flood control and the water supplies upon which residential, industrial, agricultural, and environmental water users depend. 

Miller, K, N Green Nylen, H Doremus, A Fisher, G Fogg, D Owen,
 S Sandoval Solis, J Viers, and M Kiparsky. 2018. California’s Stream Flow Monitoring System is Essential for Water Decision Making. Center for Law, Energy & the Environment, 
UC Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, CA. 4 pp. Available at: doi.org/10.15779/J2864F or law.berkeley.edu/stream-monitoring

Recharge Net Metering to Enhance Groundwater Sustainability

Recharge Net Metering (ReNeM) is a strategy that incentivizes MAR by offsetting costs incurred by landowners for operation and maintenance of water collection and infiltration systems that are placed on their land. ReNeM participants benefit directly through the rebate program; they also benefit indirectly (along with other resource users and regional aquatic systems) because MAR helps to improve and sustain the supply and quality of groundwater.

Our Issue Brief presents a concise conceptual description of ReNeM, as well as a brief account of its first implementation as a pilot program in the Pajaro Valley of California. 

Kiparsky, M, AT Fisher, WM Hanemann, J Bowie, R Kantor, C Coburn, and B Lockwood. 2018. Recharge Net Metering to Enhance Groundwater Sustainability. Center for Law, Energy & the Environment, UC Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, CA. 4 pp. https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/clee/research/wheeler/renem/ 

When is Groundwater Recharge a Beneficial Use of Surface Water?

A UC Water Issue Brief on the current status of groundwater recharge in relation to the beneficial use doctrine and recommendations for clarifying current policy in order to encourage groundwater recharge projects. 

Miller, K, N Green Nylen, H Doremus, D Owen, and A Fisher. 2018. Center for Law, Energy & the Environment,
UC Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, CA. 8 pp. Available at: doi.org/10.15779/J22D1H.

Full Reports

Designing Effective Groundwater Sustainability Agencies: Criteria for Evaluation of Local Governance Options

A new law requires California governments to form dozens of new agencies to manage groundwater. However, the law does not give them specific direction on what they will need to do, or how they can set themselves up for success. To address the need for guidance, we developed a framework to help these agencies prepare to manage this critical resource for the first time.

Kiparsky, Michael, Dave Owen, Nell Green Nylen, Juliet Christian-Smith, Barbara Cosens, Holly Doremus, Andrew Fisher, and Anita Milman. 2016. Designing Efective Groundwater Sustainability Agencies: Criteria for Evaluation of Local Governance Options. Center for Law, Energy & the Environment, U.C. Berkeley School of Law. www.law.berkeley.edu/groundwater-governance-criteria

Data for Water Decision Making

Developing data and information in a useful and usable form requires not only resources, it requires substantial commitment to the processes of building relationships and working with stakeholders. The current momentum and collaborative efforts between agencies and stakeholders are encouraging progress towards actualizing data-driven decision making for California water.

Cantor, Alida, Michael Kiparsky, Rónán Kennedy, Susan Hubbard, Roger Bales, Lidia Cano Pecharroman, Kamyar Guivetchi, Christina McCready, and Gary Darling. 2018. Data for Water Decision Making: Informing the Implementation of California’s Open and Transparent Water Data Act through Research and Engagement. Center for Law, Energy & the Environment, UC Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, CA. 56 pp. Available at: https://doi.org/10.15779/J28H01 or law.berkeley.edu/datafordecisions

Navigating Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions under SGMANavigating Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act

California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA), passed in 2014, recognizes and addresses connections between surface water and groundwater. The statute is California’s first statewide law to explicitly reflect the fact that surface water and groundwater are frequently interconnected and that groundwater management can impact groundwater-dependent ecosystems, surface water flows, and the beneficial uses of those flows. As such, SGMA partially remedies the historically problematic practice of treating groundwater and surface water as legally distinct resources.

Cantor, Alida, Dave Owen, Thomas Harter, Nell Green Nylen, and Michael Kiparsky. 2018. Navigating Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act. Center for Law, Energy & the Environment, UC Berkeley School of Law, Berkeley, CA. 50 pp. Available at: https://doi.org/10.15779/J23P87 or law.berkeley.edu/gw-sw